BWM

Ballast water is necessary for control stability,draught,trim or stresses of the ship.However,ballast water may contain harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens and sediments.

The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments was adopted by IMO.This Convention includes technical standards and guidelines to management of ships’ballast water and sediments.

 

Guidelines have been written for:

  • ballast water reception facilities;
  • sediments reception facilities;
  • ballast water sampling;
  • ballast water management equivalent compliance;
  • ballast water management plans;
  • ballast water exchange;
  • risk assessment under Regulation A-4;
  • approval of ballast water management systems;
  • procedure for approval of ballast water management systems that make use of active substances;
  • approval and oversight of prototype ballast water treatment technology programmes;
  • ballast water exchange design and construction standards;
  • sediment control on ships;
  • additional measures including emergency situations; and,
  • designation of areas for ballast water exchange.

The ballast water management plan shoud be specific to each ship and at least the following information should be included:

 

Ships’name;

Flag;

Port of registry;

Gross Tonnage;

IMO number;

Length;

Beam;

International call sign;

Total ballast capacity of the ship in cubic metres;

Identification of the appointed balllast water management officer;

drawing of the ballast system;

ballast water pump capacities;and,

ballast water treatment system.

 

Ships must have a Ballast Water Record Book (Regulation B-2) to record when ballast water is taken on board; circulated or treated for Ballast Water Management purposes; and discharged into the sea. It should also record when Ballast Water is discharged to a reception facility and accidental or other exceptional discharges of Ballast Water .

The specific requirements for ballast water management are contained in regulation B-3 Ballast Water Management for Ships:

  • Ships constructed before 2009 with a ballast water capacity of between 1500 and 5000 cubic metres must conduct ballast water management that at least meets the ballast water exchange standards or the ballast water performance standards until 2014, after which time it shall at least meet the ballast water performance standard.
  • Ships constructed before 2009 with a ballast water capacity of less than 1500 or greater than 5000 cubic metres must conduct ballast water management that at least meets the ballast water exchange standards or the ballast water performance standards until 2016, after which time it shall at least meet the ballast water performance standard.
  • Ships constructed in or after 2009 with a ballast water capacity of less than 5000 cubic metres must conduct ballast water management that at least meets the ballast water performance standard.
  • Ships constructed in or after 2009 but before 2012, with a ballast water capacity of 5000 cubic metres or more shall conduct ballast water management that at least meets the ballast water performance standard.
  • Ships constructed in or after 2012, with a ballast water capacity of 5000 cubic metres or more shall conduct ballast water management that at least meets the ballast water performance standard.

Other methods of ballast water management may also be accepted as alternatives to the ballast water exchange standard and ballast water performance standard, provided that such methods ensure at least the same level of protection to the environment, human health, property or resources, and are approved in principle by IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC).

Under Regulation B-4 Ballast Water Exchange, all ships using ballast water exchange should:

  • Whenever possible, conduct ballast water exchange at least 200 nautical miles from the nearest land and in water at least 200 metres in depth, taking into account Guidelines developed by IMO;
  • In cases where the ship is unable to conduct ballast water exchange as above, this should be as far from the nearest land as possible, and in all cases at least 50 nautical miles from the nearest land and in water at least 200 metres in depth.

When these requirements can not be met areas may be designated where ships can conduct ballast water exchange. All ships shall remove and dispose of sediments from spaces designated to carry ballast water in accordance with the provisions of the ships’ ballast water management plan (Regulation B-4).

Threatened Species

  • Spongia officinalis
  • Cyprinion macrostamus
  • Salmo trutta labrax
  • Hippocampus hippocampus
  • Acipenser sturio
  • Acipenser nudiventris
  • Elodone moschata
  • Elodone cirrhosa
  • Huso huso
  • Caretta caretta
  • Mola mola
  • Haliotis lamellosa
  • Garra rufa
  • Gerardia savaglia
  • Seal


  • 12.18.2017
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© Ms. Prof. Dr. Mükerrem Fatma İlkışık
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